Workers taking part in an intervention to reduce conflict between responsibilities at home and in the workplace experienced improved sleep duration and sufficiency, according to a new study published in Sleep Health.

“Increasing family-supportive supervision and employee control over work time benefited the sleep of hundreds of employees, and even greater effects may be possible if sleep is overtly addressed in workplace interventions,” says lead author Dr. Ryan Olson of Oregon Health & Science University.

The intervention consisted of facilitated discussions, role-playing and games for both managers and employees. Managers received additional training in family supportive supervision and had to monitor how well they applied this training when working.

READ FULL ARTICLE Curated publisher From Medical News Today