HealthDay News Patients with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM), which is typically due to a neurocardiogenic mechanism, with migraine have lower odds of mortality and acute complications compared with TCM patients without migraine, according to a study published online March 24 in Cardiovascular Revascularization Medicine.

Jobin Joseph Varghese, MD, from the MedStar Washington Hospital Center in Washington, DC, and colleagues queried the National Inpatient Sample database to examine in-hospital outcomes of TCM in patients with a concurrent diagnosis of migraine compared with those without migraine. Data were included for 172,025 TCM patients, of whom 3610 had migraines.

The researchers found that the odds of mortality and acute complications were lower for TCM patients with versus without a diagnosis of migraine (odds ratios, 0.388 and 0.511, respectively). The odds ratios remained significant after adjustment for confounding variables (adjusted odds ratios, 0.622 and 0.563, respectively).


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“There is limited research that describes a link between migraines and TCM, and to the best of our knowledge, this is the largest study investigating the relationship between migraines and TCM,” the authors write. “Further studies are required to investigate this association of migraine and its protective neurohormonal effects on TCM patients.”

One author disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical, medical device, and other industries.

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