HealthDay News — From 2011 to 2017, there was an increase in the total annual number of binge drinks per adult who reported binge drinking, according to research published in the Jan. 17 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Dafna Kanny, Ph.D., from the CDC in Atlanta, and colleagues analyzed 2011 to 2017 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data to assess trends in total annual binge drinks per adult who reported binge drinking in the United States.

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The researchers found that from 2011 to 2017, there was an increase in the age-adjusted total annual number of binge drinks per adult who reported binge drinking from 472 to 529. During the same period, total annual binge drinks per adult who reported binge drinking increased significantly among those aged 35 to 44 years (from 468 to 593; 26.7 percent) and among those aged 45 to 64 years (from 428 to 527; 23.1 percent). Adults without a high school diploma and those with household incomes <$25,000 had the largest percentage increases in total binge drinks per adult who reported binge drinking during this period (45.8 and 23.9 percent, respectively).

“These findings highlight the need to reduce the total number of binge drinks per adult who reported binge drinking by reducing the prevalence, frequency, and intensity of binge drinking,” the authors write.


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