The obesity epidemic is believed to be driven by a food environment that promotes consumption of inexpensive, convenient, high-calorie, palatable foods. Individual differences in obesity susceptibility or resistance to weight loss may arise because of alterations in the neurocircuitry supporting food reward and eating habits. In particular, dopamine signaling in the ventromedial striatum is thought to encode food reward and motivation, whereas dopamine in the dorsal and lateral striatum orchestrates the development of eating habits.

We measured striatal dopamine D2-like receptor binding potential (D2BP) using positron emission tomography with [18F]fallypride in 43 human subjects with body mass indices (BMI) ranging from 18 to 45 kg m2.

This article originally appeared on MPR