In recent years, there has been an increase in emergence and use of a variety of new drugs, so-called “novel psychoactive substances” (NPS) in the US and worldwide. However, there is little published survey data estimating the prevalence of use in the US. Media reports about use of new drugs such as “Spice” (“synthetic marijuana”) and “bath salts” such as “Flakka” are now common, yet very few health surveys ask about use of such drugs.

A new study, published in Drug and Alcohol Dependence by researchers affiliated with New York University’s Center for Drug Use and HIV Research (CDUHR), examined self-reported use of 57 different new drugs and found that prevalence of use increased from 2009 to 2013. Use of these new drugs was most common among males, whites, older individuals, those of lower income, and among those residing in cities. Use of various other illicit drugs such as LSD, cocaine, and ecstasy/MDMA (a.k.a.: “Molly”) was very common among users.

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