Lori Boardman, Author at Psychiatry Advisor

Lori Boardman

All articles by Lori Boardman

Vulvovaginal Disorders: Vulvodynia

Generalized Vulvodynia, Localized Vulvodynia, Vulvar Vestibulitis, Vestibulodynia 1. What every clinician should know Vulvodynia is defined as chronic (three or more months) vulvar discomfort, mostly commonly burning, occurring in the absence of relevant visible findings (e.g., infection, inflammation) or a specific, clinically identifiable neurologic disorder. Patients tend to fall into two groups based on location…

Vulvovaginal Disorders: Hidradenitis Suppurativa

Hidradenitis suppurativa, acne inversa, Verneuil disease 1. What every clinician should know Long thought to be a disorder of the apocrine sweat glands, Yu and Cook demonstrated in 1990 that the primary event in hidradenitis suppurative (HS) is follicular occlusion. In 2009, the Second international HS Research Symposium adopted the following consensus definition: “HS is…

Vulvovaginal Disorders: Lichen Planus

Lichen planus 1. What every clinician should know Lichen planus is the most common chronic erosive vulvar dermatosis, often presenting in the peri- and postmenopausal period. Lichen planus is an inflammatory, mucocutaneous disorder that exhibits a wide range of morphologies. The most common, most morbid, and most difficult to treat is the erosive form. Usually…

Vulvovaginal Disorders: Lichen Sclerosus

Lichen sclerosus et atrophicus 1. What every clinician should know Lichen sclerosus is a chronic disorder of the skin, most commonly seen on the vulva. Extragenital lesions are seen in 5-20% of patients. Typical lesions of lichen sclerosus are porcelain-white papules and plaques, often seen in conjunction with areas of ecchymosis or purpura. The skin…

Vulvovaginal Disorders: Dermatitis and Lichen Simplex Chronicus

Dermatitis, Eczema, Lichen Simplex Chronicus, Squamous Cell Hyperplasia 1. What every clinician should know Vulvar pruritus is the most common symptom of skin disease. In evaluating vulvar pruritus, it is helpful to differentiate women with acute symptoms from those with chronic symptoms. Acute anogenital pruritus often is infectious, with allergic and irritant contact dermatitis playing…

Vulvovaginal Disorders: Introduction to Noninfectious Vulvovaginal Diseases

Vulvovaginal symptoms 1. What every clinician should know Pruritus and pain are two of the most common presenting symptoms in women with vulvovaginal disorders. Pruritus and irritation can occur in the presence of obvious dermatologic changes or in conditions with few visible skin changes. Vulvovaginal pain or discomfort can arise in the number of settings,…

Next post in Obstetrics and Gynecology