, Author at Psychiatry Advisor - Page 2 of 430

Preparative regimens for bone marrow transplant

Preparative regimens for bone marrow transplant What every physician needs to know: What is the conditioning regimen? The preparative regimen is the combination of chemical and physical agents that is given to the patient prior to stem cell transplantation (SCT) with the purpose of reducing tumor burden and in the case of an allogeneic transplantation,…

Gallbladder polyps

How can I be sure that the patient has gallbladder polyps? Gallbladder polyps typically do not cause any symptoms. They are usually found incidentally after cholecystectomy or on imaging studies performed for other causes. Occasionally, when seen on imaging performed for abdominal pain, the symptoms may be similar to biliary pain. Detached portion of the…

Acute liver failure

How can I be sure that the patient has acute liver failure? In patients with acute liver disease, the combination of encephalopathy and laboratory evidence of a coagulopathy is the basis for the diagnosis of acute liver failure. The diagnosis must be made within 26 weeks of the first symptoms of the liver disease and…

Malignant tumors of the liver

How can I be sure that the patient has a malignant tumor of the liver? What primary malignancies occur in the liver? The most common primary malignancy that occurs in the liver is hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which accounts for about 85% of all primary hepatic cancers. The next most frequently occurring malignancy is cholangiocarcinoma. This…

Primary biliary cholangitis

How can I be sure that the patient has primary biliary cholangititis? What signs and symptoms are usually found? Fatigue and pruritus are the most common symptoms of primary biliary cholangitis (PBC), but many patients are completely asymptomatic. The fatigue is insidious and leads to a gradual reduction in the amount of daily living activities…

Pheochromocytoma

Are you sure the patient has a pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma? Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are neoplastic lesions originating from ganglia cells of the autonomic nervous system. Pheochromocytomas are localized in the adrenal medulla. Sympathetic paragangliomas are mainly found in the abdomen. Parasympathetic paragangliomas are found in the head and neck area. Classical symptoms are spell-like and…

Chondroid syringoma (Mixed tumor of the skin)

Are You Confident of the Diagnosis? Chondroid syringoma, or cutaneous mixed tumor, is an adnexal neoplasm of either apocrine or eccrine origin. It presents as a firm, dermal or subcutaneous nodule, usually between 0.5 and 3 cm. While usually solitary, cases with multiple lesions have been reported. As there is no distinctive clinical appearance, it…

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

Are You Confident of the Diagnosis? What you should be alert for in the history Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), originally termed ‘black measles’ because of the characteristic appearance, was first described in 1896 by Major Marshal H. Wood in the Snake River Valley of Idaho. It wasn’t until 1906 that Howard Ricketts identified the…

Rapidly Involuting Congenital Hemangioma(congenital non-progressive hemangioma)

Are You Confident of the Diagnosis? What you should be alert for in the history A rapidly involuting congenital hemangioma (RICH) is fully or near-fully developed at birth, with a preference for the head, neck and lower extremities. There is an equal gender distribution. The hemangioma involutes spontaneously within the first 14-18 months of life.…

Inguinal herniorrhaphy (pediatric)

What the Anesthesiologist Should Know before the Operative Procedure In addition to the usual standard preoperative examination, the following information should be obtained: Incarcerated bowel that is not reducible would require emergent surgery to prevent strangulation and bowel necrosis, while a reducible hernia may be postponed, if necessary, with the caveat that this may convert…

Next post in Anesthesiology