Teen Smoke Exposure Tied to Increase in Related Symptoms

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Non-smoking adolescents with tobacco smoke exposure have increased risk for TSE-related symptoms.
Non-smoking adolescents with tobacco smoke exposure have increased risk for TSE-related symptoms.

HealthDay News — Non-smoking adolescents with tobacco smoke exposure (TSE) have increased risk of TSE-related symptoms, according to a study published online Aug. 6 in Pediatrics.

Ashley L. Merianos, Ph.D., from the University of Cincinnati, and colleagues conducted a secondary analysis of 7,389 non-smoking adolescents to examine the correlation between distinct TSE measures and TSE-related symptoms and emergency department and/or urgent care use.

The researchers found that increased risk of reporting shortness of breath, finding it hard to exercise, wheezing during or after exercise, and dry cough at night was seen for adolescents with TSE. The odds of reporting wheezing or whistling in the chest were increased for adolescents who lived with a smoker and had home TSE; only adolescents with home TSE had elevated risk of reporting wheezing that disturbed sleep. The likelihood of reporting very good or excellent overall health and physical health was lower for adolescents with TSE, while they were more likely to report that they sometimes, often, or very often missed school due to illness. 

The likelihood of having an emergency department and/or urgent care visit was increased for participants who lived with a smoker and had TSE of at least one hour. The risk of having a higher number of emergency department and/or urgent care visits was increased for participants with any TSE.

"Any TSE increased the risk of having a higher number of emergency department and/or urgent care visits," the authors write.

Abstract/Full Text

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