Sleep Interruption Worse For Mood Than Less Sleep

Share this content:

the Psychiatry Advisor take:

Waking up multiple times in the middle of the night may negatively impact a person’s mood more than getting relatively little uninterrupted sleep.

Patrick Finan, PhD, of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, and colleagues subjected 62 men and women to one of three sleep conditions over a period of three nights: forced awakenings, delayed bedtimes, or uninterrupted sleep. Participants were asked to how they felt about a selection of positive and negative emotions, such as cheerfulness or anger.

Although there were no significant differences among the groups after the first night, after the second night, the forced awakening cohort saw a reduction of 31% in positive mood. Meanwhile, the delayed bedtime group had a 12% decline in mood compared to the first day, the researchers reported in the journal Sleep.

Also, there was no significant difference in negative mood between the two groups on any of the three days, and indication that sleep fragmentation is harmful to positive mood.

Compared with the delayed bedtime group, the forced awakening group had shorter periods of deep, slow-wave sleep. The researchers also found that interrupted sleep affected different aspects of positive mood, leading to diminished energy levels, as well as less feelings of sympathy and friendliness.  

Marijuana Use May Contribute to Insomnia
Interrupted sleep affects different aspects of positive mood, leading to diminished energy levels, as well as less feelings of sympathy.

A study led by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers suggests that awakening several times throughout the night is more detrimental to people's positive moods than getting the same shortened amount of sleep without interruption.

As they report in the November 1 issue of the journal Sleep, researchers studied 62 healthy men and women randomly subjected to three sleep experimental conditions in an inpatient clinical research suite: three consecutive nights of either forced awakenings, delayed bedtimes or uninterrupted sleep.

Participants subjected to eight forced awakenings and those with delayed bedtimes showed similar low positive mood and high negative mood after the first night, as measured by a standard mood assessment questionnaire administered before bedtimes. Participants were asked to rate how strongly they felt a variety of positive and negative emotions, such as cheerfulness or anger.

READ FULL ARTICLE From EurekAlert
You must be a registered member of Psychiatry Advisor to post a comment.

Sign Up for Free e-newsletters