No Increase Seen in Pediatric Suicide Risk With Atomoxetine vs Stimulants

Atomoxetine was not found to be associated with increased suicide risk compared with stimulant use in children and adolescents.
Atomoxetine was not found to be associated with increased suicide risk compared with stimulant use in children and adolescents.

HealthDay News -- Treatment with the selective noradrenaline-reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine is not associated with increased suicide risk compared with stimulant use in children and adolescents, according to a study published online April 26 in Pediatrics.

Stephan Linden, PhD, from the University of Florida in Gainesville, and colleagues examined the risk of suicide and suicide attempt in pediatric patients initiating treatment with atomoxetine vs stimulants in a retrospective cohort design study. The first- and second-line treatment cohorts included 279,315 and 220,215 patients, respectively.

The researchers found that in the first-line treatment cohort the adjusted hazard ratio for current atomoxetine use vs stimulant use was 0.95 during the first year of follow-up (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47 to 1.92; P=.88). The adjusted hazard ratio for current atomoxetine use vs stimulant use was 0.71 during the first year of follow-up in the second-line treatment cohort (95% CI, 0.30 to 1.67; P=.43).

"First- and second-line treatment of youths aged 5 to 18 with atomoxetine compared with stimulants was not significantly associated with an increased risk of suicidal events," the authors write. "The low incidence of suicide and suicide attempt resulted in wide confidence intervals and did not allow stratified analysis of high-risk groups or assessment of suicidal risk associated with long-term use of atomoxetine."

Two authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Loading links....
You must be a registered member of Psychiatry Advisor to post a comment.

Sign Up for Free e-newsletters