Psoriasis May Increase Risk of Developing Depression

the Psychiatry Advisor take:

Having psoriasis may increase the risk of developing major depression.

Roger S. Ho, MD, MPH, of the New York University School of Medicine, New York, and colleagues analyzed data from the National  Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2009 and 2012 that included 12,382 participants. They examined the relationship between the chronic inflammatory skin disease psoriasis and depression, after adjusting for cardiovascular risk.

In the study, 28% of participants were found to have psoriasis, and 7.8% had major depression. Also, 16.5% of patients with psoriasis also met criteria for major depression, the researchers reported in JAMA Dermatology.

Additional analyses indicated that the risk of depression was not different in patients with limited vs. extensive psoriasis. Also, a history of cardiovascular events did not affect the depression risk in psoriasis patients. However, more patients with psoriasis (23.6%) reported that any symptoms of depression caused daily functional impairment, compared with patients without psoriasis (15.4%).

Psoriasis impacts between 3% and 4% of the U.S. population, and the psychological impact of the condition can be severe.

“Our study supports that all patients with psoriasis, regardless of severity, are at risk for depressive symptoms and may benefit from depression screening,” the authors concluded.

Long-term PsA treatment may be on its way
The risk of depression was not different in patients with limited vs. extensive psoriasis.

The chronic inflammatory skin condition psoriasis was associated with the risk of major depression, although the risk was unrelated to the severity of the disorder, according to an article published online by JAMA Dermatology.

Psoriasis affects 3 percent to 4 percent of the U.S. population, and the psychological impact of psoriasis can be substantial. The identification of depression among patients with psoriasis is especially important because major depression is associated with decreased quality of life and increased all-cause mortality.

Roger S. Ho, MD, MS, MPH, of the New York University School of Medicine, New York, and coauthors examined the relationship between psoriasis and major depression in a nationally representative group, after adjusting for cardiovascular risk because prior research has suggested both depression and psoriasis are associated with cardiovascular disease.

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