Music Therapy Reduces Depression in Kids

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Music therapy can be used to help with depression in children and adolescents with behavioral and emotional problems, according to a report published in Psych Central.

Sam Porter, PhD, of the School of Nursing and Midwifery at Queen’s University, and colleagues found that music therapy significantly improved self-esteem and reduced depression in children.

Although music therapy has often been used for children with mental health needs, this study marks the first randomized control trial in a clinical setting.

The study included 251 children and adolescents, 128 of whom received typical treatment and 123 of whom received music therapy in additional to typical treatment. All participants were being treated for emotional, developmental, or behavioral problems.

Participants treated with the supplementary music therapy had significantly reduced depression and higher self-esteem than those who were treated with typical methods only. Children treated with music therapy also had improved communicative and interactive skills. Early findings indicate that the benefits are sustained in the long term.

The results of this study show the need for music therapy to be made as widely available as a mainstream treatment option. The researchers are analyzing data to gauge how cost-effective music therapy is compared with other treatments.

Music Therapy Reduces Depression in Kids
Music Therapy Reduces Depression in Kids

A new study suggests music therapy may be used to reduce depression in children and adolescents with behavioral and emotional problems.

Researchers at Queen's University Belfast found children who received music therapy had significantly improved self-esteem and significantly reduced depression compared with those who received treatment without music therapy.

Investigators also found that those who received music therapy had improved communicative and interactive skills, compared to those who received usual care options alone.

In what researchers say is the largest study of its kind, 251 children and young people were divided into two groups; 128 underwent the usual care options, while 123 were assigned to music therapy in addition to usual care.
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