Low Testosterone Linked to Depression in Men

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Men who have low or have borderline low testosterone levels are more likely to have depression or depression symptoms compared with other men, according to new research.

Michael S. Irwig, MD, associate professor of medicine and director of the Center for Andrology in the Division of Endocrinology at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., and colleagues examined 200 men between the ages of 20 and 77 years old whose testosterone levels were borderline low (between 200 and 350 nanograms per deciliter).

Researchers collected demographic information, medical histories, medication use, and symptom of hyogonadism. They then compared that information with any depressive symptoms, based on the Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9) participants completed.

More than half of the participants — 56% — had significant depression symptoms, the researchers reported at ENDO 2015, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, recently. Those in the study with depression tended to be overweight or obese, and did not engage in physical exercise.

The most common symptoms reported in the group were erectile dysfunction, low libido and low energy.

“This study underscores the utility of a validated instrument to screen for depression, especially as some subjects may deny signs and symptoms during the interview,” Irwig said in a statement. “Appropriate referrals should be made for formal evaluation and treatment of depression.”

Low Testosterone Linked to Depression in Men
Low Testosterone Linked to Depression in Men

Men with borderline testosterone levels have higher rates of depression and depressive symptoms than the general population, new research finds. The results were presented March 7 at ENDO 2015, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in San Diego.

The number of men having their testosterone levels checked has increased dramatically. Studies of the possible association between depression and serum testosterone show inconsistent results, and few studies have been published about adult men referred for the management of borderline testosterone.

The researchers collected the men's demographic information, medical histories, medication use, and signs and symptoms of hypogonadism.
 

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