Depression Increases Death Risk In Those With Heart Failure

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People who have heart failure along with depression have a much higher risk of dying than heart failure patients with no depression.

John Cleland, MD, of Imperial College London, England, and colleagues examined 154 patients who were hospitalized with heart failure. Of that number, 24 had moderate to severe depression, 27 had mild depression and 103 were not depressed. In a follow-up an average of 302 days, 27 deaths were recorded.

Those with moderate to severe depression had a five times higher risk of death than those with no or mild depression, the researchers reported in PLoS One. And those with a low depression score had an 80% lower death risk.

“Our results show that depression is strongly associated with death during the year following discharge from hospital after an admission for the exacerbation of heart failure; we expect that the link persists beyond one year,” Cleland said. “The association was independent of the severity of heart failure or the presence of comorbidities.”

Depression Increases Death Risk In Those With Heart Failure
Heart failure patients with moderate to severe depression had a five times higher risk of death than those with low or no depression.

Depression raises the risk of death among people with heart failure, according to recent research.

The study included 154 patients hospitalized with heart failure. Symptoms of depression were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, showing that 103 patients were not depressed, 27 had mild depression, and 24 had moderate to severe depression. During the followup of 302 days on average, there were 27 deaths.

Analysis showed that those with moderate to severe depression had a five times higher risk of death than those with no or mild depression. The association remained once sex, age, high blood pressure, severity of heart failure, and comorbidities were taken into account. Individuals with a low depression score had an 80 percent lower risk of death.

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