Black Women Less Likely Than White Women to Report Depression

Black Women Less Likely Than White Women to Report Depression
Black Women Less Likely Than White Women to Report Depression

HealthDay News — Black women are much less likely to report suffering from depression than white women are, a new study suggests.

Researchers culled responses from more than 1,400 black women and more than 340 white women who took part in a national survey, and found that only 10% of black women reported struggling with the mental health disorder at some point in their lives, compared with 21% of white women.

White women were also much more likely than black women to say they'd had major depression within the past 12 months (almost 9% vs. 5.5%, respectively), and to have had a mood disorder at some point in their life (about 22% vs. nearly 14%, respectively).

Where women lived also played a part in depression rates, the investigators reported in JAMA Psychiatry.

Among black women, 4% of those in rural areas and 10% of those in cities said they had suffered major depression in their lifetime, while 1.5% of those in rural areas and 5% of those in cities said they'd had major depression within the past 12 months.

Black women in rural areas were also less likely than those in cities to report having a mood disorder in their lifetime (almost 7% vs. 14%, respectively), or in the past 12 months (3% vs. more than 7%, respectively).

The reverse was true among white women, the study found. Those in rural areas were more likely than those in cities to report having major depression or mood disorder within the past 12 months (10% vs. almost 4%, respectively).

Reference

Weaver A, et al. Urban vs Rural Residence and the Prevalence of Depression and Mood Disorder Among African American Women and Non-Hispanic White Women. JAMA Psychiatry. 2015; doi: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2015.10.

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