Bisexual Women Have High Rates of Eating Disorders

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Bisexual women or women who are unsure about their sexual orientation are more likely to develop an eating disorder compared to peers who are attracted to one sex.

Annie Shearer, BA, of the College of Nursing and Health Professions at Drexel University, and colleagues, also found that women who are attracted to other woman are no more likely to experience eating disorder symptoms than women who with opposite-sex attraction. However, homosexual and bisexual men had higher rates of eating disorders than straight men.

Researchers administered a web-based behavioral health screen to more than 2,000 people, ages 11-24, during a primary care visit. Questions asked included: How often do you think that you are fat even though some people say that you are skinny? How often do you try to control your weight by making yourself throw up?

Females who were unsure of their sexual attraction had the highest eating symptoms disorders score, the researchers reported in the journal Eating Behaviors.

“Given the severe physical and emotional repercussions of eating disorders, these findings underscore the need for primary care physicians to ask about both sexuality and disordered eating symptoms during routine visits,” Shearer said in a statement.

Bisexual Women Have High Rates of Eating Disorders
Homosexual and bisexual men had higher rates of eating disorders than straight men.

Young women who are attracted to both sexes or who are unsure about who they are attracted to are more likely to develop an eating disorder than those attracted to only one sex, according to a new study from Drexel University.

However, the results of the study suggest that females attracted to the same-sex are no more likely to experience disordered eating symptoms than their peers with opposite-sex attractions. This finding is contrary to previous assumptions that same-sex attraction plays a protective role against eating pathology in females.

The study also found that males who were attracted to other males or both sexes had higher rates of eating disorders than males only attracted to the opposite sex, which is supported by previous research.

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