Anxiety, Depression in Patients With Facial Acne Not Related to Stress

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Researchers evaluated the relationships between oxidative stress, anxiety, depression, and quality of life in 60 patients with facial acne.
Researchers evaluated the relationships between oxidative stress, anxiety, depression, and quality of life in 60 patients with facial acne.

HealthDay News — High levels of anxiety and depression in patients with facial acne are not related to oxidative stress, according to a study published online in the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology.

Sara M. Awad, MD, from Assiut University in Egypt, and colleagues evaluated the relationships between oxidative stress, anxiety, depression, and quality of life in 60 patients with facial acne and 40 age- and sex-matched healthy individuals.

The researchers found that the mean Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores were higher in patients versus controls (P < 0.001 for both). Acne patients also had higher serum malondialdehyde (P = 0.019), but lower total antioxidant capacity and serum zinc levels, compared to controls (P < 0.001 and P = 0.028, respectively). There was no correlation between oxidative stress parameters and anxiety and depression scores.

"Our results indicate that the high levels of anxiety and depression in patients with facial acne were not related to oxidative stress," the authors write. "Anxiety was more common than depression and was directly related to quality of life impairment."

Reference

Awad SM, Morsy H, Sayed AA, et al. Oxidative stress and psychiatric morbidity in patients with facial acne [published online June 20, 2017]. J Cosmet Dermatol. doi: 10.1111/jocd.12366.

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