Unemployed, Not in School Youth Susceptible to Mental Health Problems

the Psychiatry Advisor take:

Young people who are not employed or taking classes are more susceptible to mental health issues.

Researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience at King’s College London, Duke University and the University of California examined results from the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study, asked more than 2,000 young British people at about age 18 about psychiatric problems and substance use disorders.

A total of 12% of the participants were not working, in school, or receiving any training. And these youths were found to have greater vulnerability to mental health issues, the researchers reported in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry. About 60% of these youths had already experienced more than one mental health problem in childhood or adolescence, compared to around 35 percent of their working or in school peers.

The unemployed, not in school youth were found to have fewer ‘soft’ skills such as problem-solving, leadership, and time management, making them less likely to succeed in the job market. However, when it comes to attitudes about work and job-seeking strategies, these young people reported higher levels of work commitment and job searching behaviors than their peers.

“First, the stress of wanting to work but being unable to can be harmful to mental health; second, employers tend to prefer applicants who seem healthier and third, because early manifestations of serious mental illness can in itself include disengagement from education and employment,” Terrie Moffitt, PhD, of King’s College London said in a statement.

Unemployed, Not in School Youth Susceptible to Mental Health Problems
Nearly 60% of these youths had already experienced more than one mental health problem in childhood or adolescence.

A new UK study finds that young people who are not employed, or not in an educational setting or receiving vocational training (NEET), are vulnerable to mental health problems, despite a strong work ethic.

Researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) at King's College London, Duke University and the University of California say that the current generation of young people face the worst job prospects in decades.

Researchers used the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study, as they assessed commitment to work, mental health problems, and substance use disorders in more than 2,000 British young people transitioning from compulsory schooling to early adulthood at the age of 18.

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