The Power of Music in Alleviating Dementia Symptoms

Share this content:
In one study, a singing intervention improved working memory among patients with mild dementia and helped to preserve executive function and orientation.
In one study, a singing intervention improved working memory among patients with mild dementia and helped to preserve executive function and orientation.
 

“Playing an instrument is a unique activity in that it requires a wide array of brain regions and cognitive functions to work together simultaneously, throughout both the right and left hemispheres,” co-author Alison Balbag, PhD, told Psychiatry Advisor. While the study did not examine causal mechanisms, “playing an instrument may be a very effective and efficient way to engage the brain, possibly granting older musicians better maintained cognitive reserve and possibly providing compensatory abilities to mitigate age-related cognitive declines.”

She notes that clinicians might consider suggesting that patients incorporate music-making into their lives as a preventive activity, or encouraging them to keep it up if they already play an instrument.

Further research, particularly neuroimaging studies, is needed to elucidate the mechanisms behind the effects of music on dementia, but in the meantime it could be a helpful supplement to patients' treatment plans. “Music has considerable potential and it should be introduced much more in rehabilitation and neuropsychological assessment,” Kerer said.

References

  1. Kerer M, Marksteiner J, Hinterhuber H, et al. Explicit (semantic) memory for music in patients with mild cognitive impairment and early-stage Alzheimer's disease. Experimental Aging Research; 2013; 39(5):536-64.
  2. Särkämö T, Laitinen S, Numminen A, et al. Clinical and Demographic Factors Associated with the Cognitive and Emotional Efficacy of Regular Musical Activities in Dementia. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease; 2015; published online ahead of print.
  3. Palisson J, Roussel-Baclet C, Maillet D, et al. Music enhances verbal episodic memory in Alzheimer's disease. Journal of Clinical & Experimental Neuropsychology; 2015; 37(5):503-17.
  4. El Haj M, Sylvain Clément, Luciano Fasotti, Philippe Allain. Effects of music on autobiographical verbal narration in Alzheimer's disease. Journal of Neurolinguistics; 2013; 26(6): 691–700.
  5. Chu H, Yang CY, Lin Y, et al. The impact of group music therapy on depression and cognition in elderly persons with dementia: a randomized controlled study. Biological Research for Nursing; 2014; 16(2):209-17.
  6. Craig J.  Music therapy to reduce agitation in dementia. Nursing Times; 2014; 110(32-33):12-5.
  7. Balbag MA, Pedersen NL, Gatz M. Playing a Musical Instrument as a Protective Factor against Dementia and Cognitive Impairment: A Population-Based Twin Study. International Journal of Alzheimer's Disease; 2014; 2014: 836748.
Page 3 of 3
You must be a registered member of Psychiatry Advisor to post a comment.

Sign Up for Free e-newsletters