Short Questionnaire Helps Diagnose Type of Dementia

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A questionnaire that takes about three minutes to finish has been developed to detect a lesser-known kind of dementia that is more difficult to diagnose than Alzheimer’s disease.

James E. Galvin, MD, MPH, a neuroscientist at Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton created the “Lewy Body Composite Risk Score” (LBCRS) survey, which features yes/no questions to diagnose Lewy Body disease, a condition characterized by loss of cognitive function, mobility, and behavior, and can also cause depression and hallucinations.

In a study involving 256 patients from the community with different comborbidies, behavioral and motor symptoms, participants were first given a 30-minute test to evaluate their cognitive status. The LBCRS was given after the test was scored and the diagnosis presented. The survey rates whether a patient has bradykinesia, rigidity, postural instability, or rest tremor without the need to measure each item.

Results showed that the LBCRS was able to discriminate between Alzheimer’s and Lewy Body disease with 96.8% accuracy, Galvin reported in the journal Alzheimer’s & Dementia.

“This new tool has the potential to provide a clearer, more accurate picture for those patients who are unable to be seen by specialists, hastening the correct diagnosis, and reducing the strain and burden placed on patients and caregivers,” Galvin said in a statement.

Short Questionnaire Helps Diagnose Type of Dementia
The survey rates whether a patient has bradykinesia, rigidity, postural instability, or rest tremor without the need to measure each item.

A leading neuroscientist has developed a three-minute survey that is able to detect Lewy Body disease (LBD), a lesser-known type of dementia that is typically more difficult to diagnose than Alzheimer's disease. The survey, known as “Lewy Body Composite Risk Score” (LBCRS), is able to discriminate between Alzheimer's disease and LBD with 96.8% accuracy.

Patients with LBD simultaneously experience losses in cognitive function, mobility, and behavior. The disease can cause visual hallucinations and make depression feel much worse.

The survey features structured yes/no questions for specific symptoms found in patients with LBD, but are much less commonly found in other forms of dementia. The LBCRS rates whether the patient has bradykinesia, rigidity, postural instability, or rest tremor without having to grade each extremity.

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