Cutting Back on Alcohol May Help Curb Dementia

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Just days before revelers get set to welcome 2015, a prominent British physician who specializes in treating dementia is recommending that a new year’s resolution people should make is cutting back their alcohol intake to reduce their chances of developing dementia.

Alistair Burns, MD, of the University of Manchester, and the National Clinical Director for Dementia in England, says that mounting evidence indicates that heavy drinking increases the risk for dementia later on in life.

“The new year is the perfect chance for us all to consider our lifestyles and think if there is anything we can improve or change to increase our healthiness — both physical and mental,” he told The Telegraph newspaper. "While stopping drinking altogether isn't a reality for many people, cutting down can make a huge difference.

"However, it can be very easy for one glass to lead to two and then to a bottle and this can seriously increase your risk of developing dementia in later life along with many other health conditions,” he added.

Dietary guidelines in the U.S. define moderate alcohol consumption as two drinks a day for men and one for women.

A study released over the summer found that alcohol abuse contributes to memory loss.

Cutting Back on Alcohol May Help Curb Dementia
Cutting Back on Alcohol May Help Curb Dementia

Drinkers should make cutting back on alcohol their New Year's resolution to reduce their chances of suffering dementia, public health officials have said. England's top dementia doctor, Professor Alistair Burns, said most studies suggested that drinking large amounts of alcohol increases the risk of dementia in later life.

"While stopping drinking altogether isn't a reality for many people, cutting down can make a huge difference," Burns said. "However, it can be very easy for one glass to lead to two and then to a bottle and this can seriously increase your risk of developing dementia in later life along with many other health conditions."

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