Coffee Consumption May Decrease Alzheimer's Risk

Share this content:

the Psychiatry Advisor take:

Several recent studies have found an association between regular, moderate coffee consumption and a reduced risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease, according to a report from News Medical.

Consuming three to five cups of coffee per day has been linked to a potentially decreased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, according to an Alzheimer Europe session report published by the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC).

A recent paper found an association between coffee consumption and a decreased risk of developing dementia over a 4-year period, but that effect diminished over longer follow-up periods. Other epidemiological studies have suggested that moderate, life-long coffee consumption can reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease by up to 20%.

Recent research has emphasized the importance of nutrition in preserving cognitive function as the brain ages. A Mediterranean diet has been associated with a decreased risk of Alzheimer’s disease; research suggests the high concentration of polyphenol compounds in this type of diet contributes to the reduced risk. High quantities of these compounds are also found in coffee.

The report details the compounds within coffee that are potentially responsible for this effect, including polyphenols and caffeine. Caffeine can help prevent the formation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. Both caffeine and polyphenols can reduce inflammation and decrease the deterioration of brain cells, particularly in the hippocampus and cortex.

The session, entitled “Nutrition and Cognitive Function,” took place on Oct. 23, 2014 in Glasgow.

Moderate coffee consumption could reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease.
Moderate coffee consumption could reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease.

Drinking 3-5 cups of coffee per day may help to protect against Alzheimer's Disease, according to research highlighted in an Alzheimer Europe session report published by the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC), a not-for-profit organisation devoted to the study and disclosure of science related to coffee and health.

The number of people in Europe aged over 65 is predicted to rise from 15.4% of the population to 22.4% by 2025 and, with an aging population, neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's Disease are of increasing concern. Alzheimer's Disease affects one person in twenty over the age of 65, amounting to 26 million people world-wide.

READ FULL ARTICLE From News Medical
You must be a registered member of Psychiatry Advisor to post a comment.

Sign Up for Free e-newsletters